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Fall 2017 Courses


General Education Courses

ENG 1115 Introduction to Literature

This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course. It does not count towards the ENG B.A. degree. There are three sections of Intro. to Lit. offered Fall 2015:

 

ENG 1115-01 Introduction to Literature

Prof. Teri Doerksen

MWF 12:30-1:20

 

ENG 1115-02 Introduction to Literature

Prof. Andrea Harris

MWF 10:30-11:20

 

ENG 1115-03 Introduction to Literature

Staff

Online


English Courses

ENG 2226-01 History of the English Language

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 1:30-2:20

We will follow the development of English from its birth as a creole on a tiny island in the 5th century AD to its present-day status as a prestigious world language.  We will trace the visual history of English by examining written texts and spelling conventions; we will explore the sound system of English, how it has changed and is changing; and we will look at the processes of variation and change in vocabulary, meaning, and grammar.  Finally, we will join the debate on the role of English in today’s world and in our own lives. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature.This course is required for the ENG BSE degree and counts as an elective for the ENG BA degree. See Dr. Holtman for more information.

 

ENG 3268-01 Survey of British Literature

Prof. Teri Doerksen

MWF 1:30-2:20

This survey course covers a thousand years of British literature from its early folk beginnings to the present, with a special focus on the 18th and 19th centuries.  Prerequisite:  ENG 1112.  This course fulfills the British Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness.

 

ENG 3278-01 Survey of American Literature

Staff

Tu Th 2:30-3:45

This course is a survey of American literature from the 1600s to the present.  Prerequisite:  ENG 1112.   This course fulfills the American Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature.

 

ENG 3333-01 (W) Advanced Writing for English Majors

Prof. Jimmy Guignard

Tu Th 2:30-3:45 p.m.

This course is designed to refine the writing skills of English majors, with an emphasis on critical analysis and the mechanics of writing. Students will read and write about a literary, rhetorical, or linguistic concept chosen by the instructor (irony in literature, for example) and revise at least one essay from their English portfolio. This course is required for all English B.A. majors.  It is not a General Education course. Prerequisites: ENG 1130 and two upper division ENG classes.

 

ENG 3364-01 American Literature Since 1900

Prof. Andrea Harris

MWF 9:30-10:20 a.m.

A study of major American writers since 1900, such as Wharton, Hurston, Stevens, O’Connor, Ginsberg, and Lahiri. Topics of study include modernism, postmodernism, race, and gender. This course is required for all English B.A. majors.  It is not a General Education course. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 .

 

ENG 3376 Major Genre: Drama

Prof. Lynn Pifer

MWF 10:30-11:20

ENG 3376 examines a major literary genre; this semester, the course will focus on drama from Sophocles to Shakespeare to Stoppard. We will begin by touching on ancient Greek drama, Shakespeare and English Renaissance drama, 19th century dramatic realism, and then focus on more modern, experimental, and absurdist plays from the U.S. and abroad. Expect reading quizzes, short analysis papers, exams, and a longer analysis paper that incorporates some research. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3404-01(W) Writing for the Web and Social Media

Prof. Brad Lint

MWF 12:30-1:20

Technology tools come and go, but principles of rhetoric, writing, and design do not. In this professional writing course, we envision writing for the web as a conversation with site visitors. In line with “reader-based prose,” this course is predicated on UX (user-experience design). Although the course includes some limited coding, it primarily extends skills learned in Composition I to the creation of sophisticated digital texts. You will create and curate content while learning to develop content strategies, write for SEO, create personas and scenarios, write key messages and layer information, and build organic style guides. You will learn to craft messages that account for user diversity, mobility, and accessibility. As we develop Web texts, we will critically analyze, debate, and discuss the rhetorical situation and controversies of many kinds of Web and social media writing. This course is taught in a computer lab and involves regular hands-on practice. No previous Web authoring experience is necessary. Projects include blogging, document redesign, a purpose-persona-scenario project, an information-rich website, presentation and facilitation, and a usability test report. This course is a core course for the new English B.A. Professional Writing Track. It is not a general education course.


Language Courses

These courses fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the new World Language and Cultures major

 

FR 1101-01 Introduction to French I

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 12:30-1:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will introduce you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

GER 1101-01 Introduction to German I

Prof. Bradley Holtman

MWF 9:30-10:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school German who wish to review their knowledge starting from the very beginning. Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are all taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required weekly. This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. 

 

ITA 1101-01 Introduction to Italian I

Prof. Bradley Holtman

MWF 10:30-11:20

Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. The course is appropriate for those with no experience or who wish to refresh their previous knowledge of the language. This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. 

 

SPA 1101 Introduction to Spanish I

Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish.  This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

There are two sections of SPA 1101 available for fall 2017:

 

SPA 1101-01 Introduction to Spanish I

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 10:30-11:20

 

SPA 1101-02 Introduction to Spanish I

Prof. William Keeth

MWF 1:30-2:20

 

SPA 1102-01 Introduction to Spanish II
This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101.  As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish.  This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

 

There are two sections of SPA 1102 offered fall 2017

SPA 1102-01 Introduction to Spanish II

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 1:30-2:20

 

SPA 1102-02 Introduction to Spanish II

Prof. William Keeth

MWF 12:30-1:20

 

SPA 2201-01 Intermediate Spanish I

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 12:30-1:20

SPA 2201 is a continuation of SPA 1102, grammar review.  This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1102 or equivalent.

 

SPA 1111-01 Spanish for Special Purposes: Healthcare I

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 9:30-10:20

Beginning level Spanish course designed to help students develop basic language skills within the context of the health field. It constitutes the first of a four-course sequence that approaches language learning through intercultural literacy. This course emphasizes the use of Spanish in realistic and practical situations within the medical environment, while underscoring the cultural richness and diversity of the Latin American and Caribbean patient’s background. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1).


World Language and Culture Courses

WLC 2520-01 Introduction to Latin American Cultures

Prof. William Keeth

MWF 9:30-10:20

This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2).

 

WLC 3320-01 France through Film

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MW 2:30-3:45

Watching current French-language films (with English subtitles) is one of the best ways to learn how the French live and work. People in France are as diverse as people in America, but in a distinct way, so life in France today is much the same as but also very much different from life in the United States. The French film industry makes films that are not like those made in Hollywood. They maintain a European and French flavor. The ones chosen for the course illustrate key periods of modern French society from the pre-Revolutionary period to the 21st century. We will reflect on the interaction of social systems in France and other French-speaking places. We will work on analytical skills and learn how to better understand a film’s various meanings. We’ll read some literature and essays and relate them to a complex background of historical, social, and cultural events.This course is taught in English and does not require any knowledge of French. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2).