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Mansfield University... Developing Tomorrow's Leaders English


Spring 2015 Courses


Spring 2015 Courses

ENG 1115 - Introduction to Literature
Introduction to reading poetry, fiction, drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a general education course which counts towards the English minor but does not count towards the English major. This course can be used in the Language and Literature category in the old General Education program and in the Approaches to Knowledge: Humanities category in the new. There are no prerequisites for this course.

There are three sections offered in Spring 2015:

ENG 1115-01 Prof. Teri Doerksen
MWF 12:30

ENG 1115-02 Prof. Teri Doerksen
MWF 1:30

ENG 1115-03 Prof. Lynn Pifer
MWF 10:30-11:20

ENG 1115-04 Prof. Marissa Scott
Tu Th 1:00-2:15

ENG 220x - Readings in… courses count for general education requirements, but are not courses for the English major. There are no prerequisites for these courses.
There are three Readings in … courses offered in Spring 2015:

ENG 2204-01 - Readings in World Literature
Prof. Brad Lint
MWF 9:30
When people think of the world’s oldest printed book, they often think of The Gutenberg Bible (c. 1455). 587 years earlier, however, The Diamond Sutra was printed in China. China lays claim to the world’s oldest living language; even though it is made up of eleven languages and several dozen dialects, its written script is the same (some common words in English come from Chinese, such as tea, ketchup, and “long time no see”). With five thousand years of history, China represents one of the oldest continuous cultures in the world. With 1.4 billion people, China remains the world’s most populous nation, and in the next few years, China is expected to overtake the United States as the world’s biggest economy. How is it, then, that we still know relatively little about China? In Spring 2014, ENG 2204 will focus on Chinese Literature, Culture, and Film. We will begin with excerpts from the Classic of Poetry, the Spring and Autumn Annals, the Analects of Confucius, and the philosophical musings of Laozi and Zhuangzi. We’ll read poems from Tang Dynasty poets such as Wang Wei, Li Bai, Du Fu, and Hanshan. We’ll dive into one of the Four Great Classical Novels. We’ll also discuss modern works by writers such as Lu Xun, Aileen Chang, and Mo Yan. Throughout the semester, we’ll view a few examples of contemporary Chinese cinema (including Hong Kong action film). This is an introductory level course for the non-English major: no understanding of Chinese language, history, culture, or literature is presumed or expected, but you may very well learn a few facts, phrases, and characters along the way! General Education Requirement: Global, Language and Literature.

ENG 2208-01 - Readings in American Literature
Prof. Abby Werlock
Tu Th 1:00-2:15
Students in English 2208 “Readings in American Literature,” will explore fiction and poetry written from the medieval era through the present that fit into the theme of “Heroes and Villains, Saints and Sinners.” The selections will offer us an opportunity to consider the ways literature affects our concepts of good and evil and consequently the ways we view ourselves and others, with an aim of engaging students in concentrated analysis while developing sophisticated critical thinking skills. In order to achieve these goals, the mode of instruction will focus primarily on class discussions, group activities, and writing exercises. This is an introductory level course for the non-English major to develop interpretive and critical-analytical skills, cultural understanding, and enjoyment of literature through selected readings in American literature. General Education Requirement: Language and Literature, Humanities

ENG 2209-01/HON 2255-01 - Readings in Shakespeare
Prof. Ed Washington
Tu Th 10:00-11:15
ENG 2209 is an introductory level course for the non-English major to develop interpretive and critical-analytical skills, cultural understanding, and enjoyment of literature through selected poems and plays by William Shakespeare. Following an overview of Shakespeare’s dynamic Renaissance world and an examination of his sonnets, the course will cover six Shakespeare plays, both comedy and tragedy. A provocative film version of the villainous Richard III will be shown at mid semester.  Close readings of the plays will be supplemented by a wide array of audio and video tools and in class performances as time permits. An extra credit field trip to see a Shakespeare play is also part of the course. Lively class participation, two short papers, two exams. Course expectations are geared toward the general education student. No Prerequisites. This is a general education course designed for non-English majors; it does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree. English majors should take ENG 3352: Shakespeare (see below). This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

ENG 3322-01 - Food Literature
Prof. Andrea Harris
MWF 1:30-2:20
A grassroots food movement is expanding rapidly in the United States as an alternative to the conventional, corporate food production system. Although a close connection between food and humans once prevailed, as consumers, we are now disconnected from our food, with serious consequences for society, health, and the environment. We will read interdisciplinary texts with the goal of learning how to preserve resources and create a sustainable future through our behavior and choices regarding food. The course involves essay exams, a presentation, and short papers. Prerequisites: 30 credit hours. This is a General Education course (University and Diversity of Humanity: Themes: Environmental, Economic, Social, and Personal Sustainability); it does not count towards the English major.


Courses for the English Major

ENG 2226-01 - History of the English Language
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 12:30-1:20
We will follow the development of English from its birth as a creole on a tiny island in the 5th century AD to its present day status as a prestigious world language. We will trace the visual history of English by examining written texts and spelling conventions; we will explore the sound system of English, how it has changed and is changing; and we will look at the processes of variation and change in vocabulary, meaning, and grammar. Finally, we will join the debate on the role of English in today’s world and in our own lives. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature. This course is required for the ENG BSE degree and counts as an elective for the ENG BA degree. See Dr. Holtman for more information

ENG 2252-01(W) - Introduction to Poetry Writing
ENG 3252-01(W) - Advanced Poetry Writing
Prof. Lilace Guignard
Tu Th 1:00-2:15

ENG 2252 - Introduction
In this class we will immerse ourselves in contemporary adult poetry; experience a broad range of styles and poetic devices; try new things (as readers and writers); develop a vocabulary for analyzing the choices a writer makes and the effects of those choices; play with language; fly toward our fears; explode our senses; and break our own hearts. Designed to help students develop their voices and styles as poets and to discover and utilize the various poetic devices and forms through writing exercises, reading and discussing poems, discussing one another’s poems in a supportive atmosphere and through revising poems.
Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ENG 3252. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience

ENG 3252 - Advanced
In this class we will immerse ourselves in contemporary adult poetry; experience a broad range of styles and poetic devices; try new things (as readers and writers); develop a vocabulary for analyzing the choices a writer makes and the effects of those choices; play with language; fly toward our fears; explode our senses; and break our own hearts. Be prepared to write a poem a week, workshop weekly, and scrutinize your obsessions. Students further develop their skills as poets by studying contemporary poetry by a wide diversity of writers, writing their own poems, and learning about select theories of poetics. Emphasis will be on students developing a body of work to be edited into a chapbook. Students will give presentations about a “poet mentor,” learn how to evaluate literary markets and how to submit poetry manuscripts for publication, and give a reading of their poems. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ENG 2252. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience. Prerequisite: ENG 2252.

ENG 2254-01(W) - Introduction to Fiction Writing
ENG 3254-01(W) - Advanced Fiction Writing
Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum
Tu Th10:00-11:15

ENG 2254: Intro to Fiction Writing: The success of a piece of writing rests on its truth and on its voice. By voice, I mean the tone in which it is told and the language used to tell it. By truth, I mean its honesty and its passion. The point of this 3-credit class is for you to find your true voice and true concerns as a writer, while mastering the essentials of fiction writing -- character, setting, dialogue, style, voice, etc. In this class, we will work on our writing -- first with exercises and then with complete works -- but we will also work on becoming better readers, both of each other’s work and of the stories in the anthology. Class time will be spent writing, discussing the assigned readings, and workshopping each other’s writing. This course can be used by English B.A. students as an English Elective and can serve as a Language and Literature course in the old General Education program and as Arts and the Human Experiences course in the new. This course is dual listed with ENG 3254: Advanced Fiction Writing.

ENG 3254: Advanced Fiction Writing: This course continues the work done in ENG 2254. Through writing exercises, reading the work of published writers, and workshopping original manuscripts, students will work on creating a portfolio of short fiction or the first three chapters of a novel. This course can be used as an English "elective" and can serve as a General Education course in the Arts and the Human Experiences category of the new program. This course is dual listed with ENG 2254: Intro to Fiction Writing. Prerequisite: ENG 2254 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3269-01 - Survey of British Literature II
Prof. Teri Doerksen
MWF 10:30-11:20
Survey of British Literature II covers major British literature from the Romantics through the present. We’ll be looking at Romantic and Victorian poetry, reading a selection of non-fiction essays, and reading novels by Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Kazuo Ishiguro, and J.K. Rowling. This course fits the British Survey requirement for English majors. This course can be used in the Language and Literature category in the old General Education program, and in the Approaches to Knowledge: Humanities category in the new General Education Program.
Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

ENG 3280-01 - Survey of American Literature II
Prof. Abby Werlock
Tu Th 10:00-11:15
This course is a survey of American writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. In addition to spanning literary genres, the course provides an overview of the diverse voices producing literature during this period, with special attention given to the historical, social and literary contexts of the selections. This course fits the American Survey requirement for English majors. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

ENG 3327-01 - African American Literature: Neo-Slave Narrative
Prof. Lynn Pifer
MWF 9:30-10:20
This course examines African American novels that are modeled after or inspired by 18th and 19th century African and African American slave narratives. We will begin with a brief discussion of early slave narratives and move directly to twentieth and twenty-first century novels that demonstrate the influence of the slave narrative. We will discuss the nature the slave narrative genre, its impact on the American literary canon, and the nature of a new and growing sub-genre, the neo slave narrative. Students should increase their skills in closely reading and analyzing literature as we read, discuss, and write about these novels. This course counts as a World/Minority course or as an English elective for English majors and minors, as an elective course for the African American Studies minor, and as an elective for the Women's Studies minor. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112

ENG 3328-01 - Lesbian and Gay Literature
Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum
Sat. 9:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
In this class we will read and discuss works by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered writers, and we will also talk about what it is to be an LGBT individual in our society, bringing in film, music, television, newspaper and magazine articles, art, and history. The emphasis of the course will be on active discussion and close introspection into the literature, our culture, and ourselves. Course requirements include active participation, quizzes, several response papers, a group project, and a final exam. This course may be used to fill the World/Minority requirement for English majors or as an elective for English majors and minors. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Ethics and Civic Responsibility, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112

ENG 3332-01(W) - Nature Writing
Prof. Jimmy Guignard
Tu Th 2:30-3:45
Based on reading, observation, and experience, students will write creative non-fiction prose about nature and discuss each other's work. The course will deal with such issues as the importance of place, the role of science in personal responses to nature, the nature of Nature, and the meaning of "nonfiction" in nature writing. This course counts as an English elective for English majors, as an elective for the creative writing minor, and as an elective course in the new Professional Writing Track for the ENG BA degree. This course can also be used in the Language and Literature category in the old General Education program, and in the Unity and Diversity of Humanity: Sustainability category in the new General Education Program. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112

ENG 3352-01 (W)/HON 4455-04 (W) - Shakespeare
Prof. Ed Washington
Tu Th 2:30-3:45
Selected plays of Shakespeare with interpretation, evaluation, and attention to his development as a dramatist and poet. The course begins with an overview of the Renaissance period and an examination of Shakespeare’s sonnets. Six plays will be covered, both comedy and tragedy. A provocative film version of the villainous Richard III, a history play and a pre-tragedy, will be shown around mid semester. Close reading of the Shakespearean text will be aided and enhanced by a full range of audio and video tools. If the opportunity arises, there will be a field trip arranged to see one of the plays. Class participation, two exams, one short critical paper and one longer research paper. Course expectations are geared toward upper class students. This course is required for all B.A. and B.S.E. majors. It is not a general education course. Prerequisites: ENG 1112W and one of the following: ENG 1130, ENG 1115, ENG 2207, ENG 2209

ENG 3364-01 - American Literature Since 1900
Prof. Andrea Harris
MWF 12:30-1:20
Twentieth-century literature reflects both the violent upheavals and thrilling changes of the last century. As such, it is literature that breaks the rules and “makes it new,” as Ezra Pound stated. We will study the modernist reworking of genres and forms; the emphasis on language and textual play; the shifting relations between sexes, classes, and races in the period; and what is uniquely American about this writing. As we move on to contemporary or postmodern writing, from 1945 to the present, we will focus will focus on the relation between the contemporary and the modern: in what ways is contemporary writing both a reaction against and a continuation of modern writing? Authors include Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Allen Ginsberg, and Jhumpa Lahiri. This course fulfills the American Period requirement for English majors and may be used as an elective for English majors and minors. It is not a general education course. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

ENG 3371-01(W) - Professional Writing
Prof. Brad Lint
MWF 10:30-11:20
Do you want to get a jump on the job market? Do you want to hone your skills now so you’ll be ready for the work world when you graduate? It’s never too early to begin preparing for a career (even if you’re not sure what you want to do!), and this course is a great place to start. This advanced writing course focuses on the writing strategies and tactics professionals need in order to write successfully on the job. You will become familiar with the discourse practices common to the workplace -- including collaborative writing, proposals, and digital media -- and learn to manage those practices effectively in your own written work. You will become proficient in the major genres of professional writing and learn how to communicate different messages in varied formats to multiple audiences. Building on the foundation laid in ENG 1112, you will refine your writing for clarity, concision, style, and grace. This project-based course includes a workplace report, a job application project (including job search, resume building, tailored cover letters, and interview skills), a correspondence project (business letters, memos, email, and social media), a panel presentation, and a collaborative white paper. You will also learn principles of effective design for use in print and media. This course may be used as an elective within the English BA program and English minor program, or as a free elective by English BSE majors. It is not a general education course. It is a required course in the new Professional Writing Track for the ENG BA degree. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112.

ENG 3382-01 - Contemporary Literary Theory and Criticism
Prof. John Ulrich
Tu Th 1:00-2:15
This course focuses on the various methods of critical analysis currently employed in literary studies, with particular attention to the terms and stakes of the ongoing debate about the role of "theory" with respect to the study and teaching of literature.  As we survey the shifting terrain of contemporary literary theory, our theoretical “map" will include New Criticism, Russian Formalism, Structuralism, Narratology, Post-Structuralism and Deconstruction, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, Queer Studies, Marxism, New Historicism and Cultural Studies, Postcolonial and Race Studies, and Reader Response Theory. This course fulfills the Major Author/Major Genre/Contemporary Theory requirement within the English BA and BSEd degree programs. Alternatively, it may be used to fulfill an English elective requirement within the English BA program. It is not a general education course, so for non-English majors, this course is a free elective. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and ENG 1130

ENG 4401-01 (W) - Seminar in Literary Theory: Postmodern Theory and Practice
Prof. John Ulrich
W 6:15-9:15
This course focuses on the late twentieth-century debate about the term "postmodernism," a debate that still continues today. A notoriously elusive term, "postmodernism" can be used to describe aesthetic and critical movements in a variety of disciplines, including art, architecture, music, literature, literary theory, and philosophy. The term is also widely understood as referring to the condition of everyday life under late or hyper-capitalism. In a world where all forms are exhausted and artistic autonomy is discredited, postmodern literature often steeps itself in popular culture, turning to pastiche, parody, and self-conscious irony to signal both its critique of, and complicity with, postindustrial culture. To explore this controversial terrain of "postmodernism," we will investigate both postmodern theory and postmodern literary practices. Our postmodern theorists will include Ihab Hassan, Jean Baudrillard, Guy Debord, Jean-François Lyotard, Linda Hutcheon, Andreas Huyssen, Hal Foster, Donna Haraway, and others. Among postmodern authors, we will read texts by Jorge Luis Borges, William S. Burroughs, Vladimir Nabokov, John Barth, Thomas Pynchon, Margaret Atwood, Ishmael Reed, Kathy Acker, Douglas Coupland, William Gibson, Jeannette Winterson, and more. This is the required capstone course for all English majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and 75 earned credits.

JN 1100-01 - Introduction to Journalism
Prof. Dan Mason
Tu Th 10:00-11:15
This course introduces the nature and practice of newsgathering, reporting, writing, editing, and professionalism. Students acquire basic skills by covering textbook examples and off-campus breaking stories. This course serves as a prerequisite for upper-level JN courses. It counts as an elective course in the new Professional Writing Track for the ENG BA degree.


World Language and Culture Courses

These courses will count in the newly proposed World Language and Culture major:

WLC 2520-01 - Introduction to Latin American Cultures
Prof. William Keeth
MWF 12:30-1:20
This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora. This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2)

WLC 2500-01 - Introduction to Paris
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MW 2:30-3:45
This course is an introduction to everyday life in Paris, at once a global modern city and a living museum. Paris is a vibrant culture and commercial hub and the academic place of excellence in France, a city of continuity and change, of love and conflicts - the home of expatriates, artists, romantics, and revolutionaries of every kind. We will study the history and geography of Paris and trace the city’s evolution, from its Roman arena to its Eiffel Tower, from the Louvre’s medieval foundations to its ultra-modern glass pyramid. We will look at architecture, painting, sculpture, music, literature, film, and popular culture and study how they express ways of life over the centuries. This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2)

WLC 3336 - Germany: A Virtual Tour
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 12:30-1:20
This course aims to give you an overview of the regional geography of Germany and many other aspects of German culture in general. Discussions and presentations will make use of the vast resources of the Internet as well as other print and audiovisual materials. Without requiring you to master everything, the course offers a comprehensive global view of contemporary Germany in a relaxed, non-pressured atmosphere. Course participants will finish the course with a solid base knowledge of the German states, many cities and towns, regions, touristic attractions and curiosities, industrial production, and technological developments within each state, as well as cultural information and a vast array of other facts and figures. You will become aware of a great number of sources for additional infor­mation and web browsing opportunities, as well as sources for online German newspapers and audio/video material. Your speaking and presentation skills will also improve, as you will be make and listen to class presentations. In general, you will have a much more detailed picture of what contemporary Germany is all about after you have completed this geography-based course. And you will have many ideas about what to visit for future trips to Germany! This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2).


Language Courses

These courses fulfill the language requirement for the English major, and the newly proposed World Language and Cultures major:

FR 1101-01 - Intro to French I
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MWF 12:30-1:20
For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on grammar, pronunciation drills, aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing with language lab. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

FR 1102-01 - Intro to French II
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MWF 10:30-11:20
French 1102 is a continuation of 1101 with language lab. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisites: FR 1101 or equivalent.

GER 1102 - Intro to German II
Prof. Bradley Holtman
MWF 9:30-10:20
The second semester of Introductory German starts from where we left off at the end of the first semester course; 1101 knowledge or equivalent experience is assumed. You will recycle and master older material as you learn new vocabulary and structures while continuing to acquire intercultural knowledge. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and be understood at least at a survival level in a variety of basic situations. You will have exposure to various accents and will not be afraid of hearing someone speak German at a native speaker’s rate. You will continue to discover the many cultural differences between your own country and the German-speaking countries. You will have a very good ‘feel’ for how things look in those lands, how people do things, highlights of German geography and many other insights you’ve probably never had before. And you’ll be able to express a good amount of it in German, both in writing and orally. In short, you’ll be ready to try out your skills in a German-speaking country! This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisites & Notes: GER 1101 or equivalent.

SPA 1101 - Intro to Spanish I
Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

There are three sections of SPA 1101 available for Spring 2014:

SPA 1101-01 - Intro to Spanish I
Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
MWF 12:30-1:20

SPA 1101-02 - Intro to Spanish I
Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 1:30-2:20

SPA 1101-03 - Intro to Spanish I
Prof. William Keeth
MWF 9:30-11:20

SPA 1102-01 - Intro to Spanish II
Prof. William Keeth
MWF 10:30-11:20
This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101. As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

SPA 2201-01 - Intermediate Spanish I
Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
MWF 10:30-11:20
As the springboard to intermediate-level Spanish, this course requires either three years of High School Spanish or the completion of Spa 1102. In this course students will practice, strengthen, and develop their oral and written communication so as to successfully negotiate straight-forward communicative situations. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1102 or equivalent.

SPA 2205-01 - Pronunciation and Phonetics
Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
MWF 9:30-10:20
A study of the speech organs, place and manner of articulation of Spanish phonemes and their phonetic realizations, along with extensive practice exercise on pronunciation, intonation, stress and sentence rhythm. The numerous changes occurring in connected and rapid speech will be studied as well. Students will also be introduced to some Spanish dialects and regional pronunciation patterns. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1102 or equivalent; SPA 2201 or higher is preferred.

Pending approval, the 1-credit extension linked to the Paris trip:

WLC 2255 - Paris The City Experience 
To enhance understanding and knowledge of the city, this 1-credit 10-day extension provides an intercultural experience in Paris, France, with on-site activities related to parts of the course on Paris.

Through journal writing and the completion of a personal project, you’ll learn more about Paris—its history, its geography, its architecture and monuments, and some of the artistic movements that marked it. You’ll come to appreciate the charm, beauty and complexity of the city, as well as its place in France and Europe and its historical meaning. You’ll develop your cultural sensitivity and become more confident about traveling, studying, or working abroad.