Fall 2016 Courses



General Education Courses

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WS 1100-01 - Introduction to Women's Studies

MWF 10:30-11:20

Prof. Andrea Harris

Although most American people believe in women's right to social and economic equality, a basic definition of feminism, many of them do not define themselves as feminists.  In this course, we’ll consider the relevance of feminism for our culture today today by examining women’s history, global issues affecting women, popular culture, and young women’s views of feminism.  We will apply the principles of feminism to the world around us; thus, the course will involve discussion of personal experiences relevant to the reading material. Assignments include short papers, exams, and a presentation. This course counts towards the women's studies minor; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Ethics and Civic Responsibility.

 

ENG 1115 - Introduction to Literature

This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course.  It does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree. There are three sections of Introduction to Literature offered in Fall 2016:


ENG 1115-01 - Introduction to Literature

MWF 12:30-1:20

Prof. Teri Doerksen

 

ENG 1115-02 - Introduction to Literature

Tu Th 1:00-2:15

Prof. David Stinebeck

 

ENG 1115-190 - Introduction to Literature

Online

Staff

 

 

English Major Courses

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ENG 2226-01 - History of the English Language

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. Bradley Holtman

We will follow the development of English from its birth as a creole on a tiny island in the 5th century AD to its present day status as a prestigious world language.  We will trace the visual history of English by examining written texts and spelling conventions; we will explore the sound system of English, how it has changed and is changing; and we will look at the processes of variation and change in vocabulary, meaning, and grammar. Finally, we will join the debate on the role of English in today’s world and in our own lives. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature.  This course is required for the ENG BSE degree and counts as an elective for the ENG BA degree. See Dr. Holtman for more information.

 

ENG 2252-01 (W) - Introduction to Poetry Writing

Tu Th 8:30-9:45

Staff

Designed to help students develop their voices and styles as poets and to discover and utilize the various poetic devices and forms through writing exercises, reading and discussing poems, discussing one another's poems in a supportive atmosphere, and through revising poems.  This course is required in the Creative Writing minor and may be used as an elective course in the English BA major; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience.

 

ENG 2254-01(W) - Introduction to Fiction Writing

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

The success of a piece of writing rests on its truth and on its voice.  By voice, I mean the tone in which it is told and the language used to tell it.  By truth, I mean its honesty and its passion. The point of this 3-credit class is for you to find your true voice and true concerns as a writer, while mastering the essentials of fiction writing -- character, setting, dialogue, style, voice, etc.  In this class, we will work on our writing -- first with exercises and then with complete works -- but we will also work on becoming better readers, both of each others'  work and of the stories in the anthology.  Class time will be spent writing, discussing the assigned readings, and workshopping each others' writing.  This course is a prerequisite for ENG 3254 - Advanced Fiction WritingThis course is required in the newly revised Creative Writing minor and may be used as an elective course in the English BA major; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience.

 

ENG 3254-01(W) - Advanced Fiction Writing

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

This course continues the work done in ENG 2254. Through writing exercises, reading the work of published writers, and workshopping original manuscripts, students will work on creating a portfolio of short fiction or the first three chapters of a novel. This course can be used as an English "elective" and can serve as a General Education course in the Arts and the Human Experiences category of the new program. This course is dual listed with ENG 2254: Intro to Fiction Writing. Prerequisite: ENG 2254 or permission of instructor. 

 

ENG 3268-190 - Survey of British Literature I

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. Teri Doerksen

This survey course covers a thousand years of British literature from its early folk beginnings through the first glimmers of the novel in the mid-1700s.  Prerequisite:  ENG 1112.  This course fulfills the British Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness.

 

ENG 3278-01 - Survey of American Literature I

Tu Th 2:30-3:45

Prof. David Stinebeck

This course is a survey of 17th, 18th, and early 19th century American writers.  Prerequisite:  ENG 1112.   This course fulfills the American Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature.

 

ENG 3327-01 - African American Literature: Neo-Slave Narrative

MWF 10:30-11:20

Prof. Lynn Pifer

This course examines African American novels that are modeled after or inspired by 18th and 19th century African and African American slave narratives. We will begin with a brief discussion of early slave narratives and move directly to twentieth and twenty-first century novels that demonstrate the influence of the slave narrative. We will discuss the nature the slave narrative genre, its impact on the American literary canon, and the nature of a new and growing sub-genre, the neo slave narrative. Students should increase their skills in closely reading and analyzing literature as we read, discuss, and write about these novels. This course counts as a World/Minority course or as an English elective for all English majors and minors, as an elective course for the African American Studies minor, and as an elective for the Women's Studies minor. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112

 

ENG 3371-01(W) - Professional Writing

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. Brad Lint

Do you want to get a jump on the job market? Do you want to hone your skills now so you’ll be ready for the work world when you graduate? It’s never too early to begin preparing for a career (even if you’re not sure what you want to do), and this course is a great place to start. This course focuses on the writing strategies and tactics professionals need to write successfully on the job. You will become familiar with the discourse practices common to the workplace and learn to manage those practices effectively in your own written work. This project-based course includes a workplace report, a job application project (including job search, resumes, cover letters, and job interview skills), a correspondence project (business letters, memos, and email), and a collaborative grant proposal. Building on the foundation in ENG 1112, you will also refine your writing for clarity, concision, style, and grace while learning principles of effective design for use in print and media presentations. This is a required course for the BA English - Professional Writing. It is not a general education course. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3382-01 - Contemporary Literary Theory and Criticism

MWF 9:30-10:20

Prof. Andrea Harris

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, writing about literature took radically new directions, with a strong influence from disciplines outside of literature, such as linguistics and philosophy. These various theoretical approaches or schools had in common a self-reflexive stance: theory questions what literature is, what it means to read it, and how it relates (or does not relate) to the culture of which it forms a part. We will survey the main theoretical schools of the twentieth century, such as post-structuralism, queer studies, and postcolonial studies. Assignments include short papers, exams, and a final research paper. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and ENG 1130.

 

ENG 3387-01 - Disaster Literature

Tu Th 1:00-2:15

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

This class explores what the influential critic and novelist Susan Sontag has called “the imagination of disaster.” While natural and unnatural disasters have provided Hollywood and science fiction writers with material for decades, less familiar are the meditations on disasters that serious novelists have taken up in literary fiction. In this class we will consider how novelists imagine catastrophe. From pandemic to plague, climate change to global anti-US backlash, genetic engineering to nuclear war, alien invasion to zombie pandemic, from swift destruction unleashed by human avarice to the slow death of a dying world, we will examine the ways fiction reaffirms, questions, or rewrites the modalities of disaster. Along the way we will consider the social, historical, and political contexts of disaster fiction, exploring what it means to “think the unthinkable” in different times and places. We'll examine the recent surge in disaster literature—to what extent is it a predictor of our future and to what extent a warning? With a tumultuous presidential election looming just ahead, what better time to talk apocalypse, destruction, darkness and disaster? Expect stimulating reading, spectacular discussions, and terrifying visions. The emphasis of the course will be on active discussion and close introspection into the literature, our society, and ourselves. Course requirements include classroom participation, online discussion forums, quizzes, papers, tests, and a final project, in which we'll explore our own visions of the future that awaits us, and the steps we can take to influence that future.

 

 

World Language and Culture Courses

These count in the newly proposed World Language and Culture major

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WLC 2500-01 - Introduction to Paris

MW 2:30-3:45

Prof. Monique Oyallon

This course is an introduction to everyday life in Paris, at once a global modern city and a living museum. Paris is a vibrant culture and commercial hub and the academic place of excellence in France, a city of continuity and change, of love and conflicts – the home of expatriates, artists, romantics, and revolutionaries of every kind. We will study the history and geography of Paris and trace the city's evolution, from its Roman arena to its Eiffel Tower, from the Louvre's medieval foundations to its ultra-modern glass pyramid. We will look at architecture, painting, sculpture, music, literature, film, and popular culture and study how they express ways of life over the centuries.

 

WLC 2520-01 - Introduction to Latin American Cultures

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. William Keeth

This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2)

 

 

Language Courses

These fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the newly proposed World Language and Cultures major

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FR 1101-01 - Introduction to French I

MWF 12:30-1:20

Prof. Monique Oyallon

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will introduce you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. 

General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

 

GER 1101 - Introduction to German I

MWF 9:30-10:20

Prof. Bradley Holtman

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school German who wish to review their knowledge starting from the very beginning. Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are all taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required weekly. This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.  Prerequisite: GER 1101 or equivalent.

 

SPA 1101 - Introduction to Spanish I

Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish.This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. There are three sections of SPA 1101 offered in Fall 2016:

 

            SPA 1101-01 - Introduction to Spanish I

            MWF 10:30-11:20

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

 

            SPA 1101-02 - Introduction to Spanish I

            MWF 9:30-10:20

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

 

            SPA 1101-03 - Introduction to Spanish I

            MWF 9:30-10:20
            Prof. William Keeth

 

SPA 1102-01 - Introduction to Spanish II
This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101.  As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish.  This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent. There are two sections of SPA 1102 offered in Fall 2016:


            SPA 1102-01 - Introduction to Spanish II
            MWF 1:30-2:20

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

 

            SPA 1102-02 - Introduction to Spanish II
            MWF 10:30-11:20

            Prof. William Keeth

 

SPA 2201-01 - Intermediate Spanish I

MWF 12:30-1:20

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

SPA 2201 is an intermediate level Spanish language course.  The main objective of this course is to continue developing the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as to increase the students’ understanding and appreciation of the Spanish and Latin American cultures.  Emphasis will be placed on oral and written communication.This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1102 or equivalent.


Last updated: April 20, 2016