Spring 2016 Courses


General Education Courses

 

ENG 1115 Introduction to Literature

This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course. It does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree. There are three sections of Intro. to Lit. offered Fall 2015:

 

ENG 1115-01

Introduction to Literature

Prof. Andrea Harris

MWF 12:30-1:20

 

ENG 1115-02

Introduction to Literature

Prof. Lynn Pifer

MWF 10:30-11:20

 

ENG 1115-190

Introduction to Literature

Prof. Ed Washington

Online

 


English Major Core Courses

 

ENG 3333-01 (W): Advanced Writing for English Majors

Tu 6:15-9:15 p.m.

Prof. Jimmy Guignard

This course is designed to refine the writing skills of English majors, with an emphasis on critical analysis and the mechanics of writing. Students will read and write about a literary, rhetorical, or linguistic concept chosen by the instructor (irony in literature, for example) and revise at least one essay from their English portfolio. This course is required for all English B.A. and B.S.E. majors. It is not a General Education course. Prerequisites: ENG 1130 and two upper division ENG classes.

 

ENG 3352-01 (W)/HON 4455-04 (W) Shakespeare

Prof. Ed Washington

Tu Th 2:30-3:45

Selected plays of Shakespeare with interpretation, evaluation, and attention to his development as a dramatist and poet. The course begins with an overview of the Renaissance period and an examination of Shakespeare’s sonnets. Six plays will be covered, both comedy and tragedy. A provocative film version of Richard III, a history play and a pre-tragedy, will be shown around mid-semester. Close readings of the text will be enhanced by a full range of audio and video tools. Bring your theory caps if you have them. If the opportunity arises, there will be an extra credit trip to see one of the plays. Class participation, two exams, two very short critical papers, and one longer research paper. Course expectations are geared toward upper class students. This course is required for all B.A. and B.S.E. majors. It is not a general education course. Prerequisites: ENG 1112W and one of the following: ENG 1130, ENG 1115, ENG 2207, ENG 2209

 

ENG 4401-01 (W) Seminar in Literary Studies: Faulkner and Morrison

Prof. Lynn Pifer

M W F 9:30-10:20

This intensive seminar, which is required of all English majors, focuses on two Nobel Prize-winning American authors, William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Although they seem to represent opposite ends of the American literary canon (particularly if one considers their race, gender, and/or social class), both address cultural issues unique to our country as well as universal themes that encourage readers to examine their own concepts of history, truth, and humanity. You will write weekly response papers and take a midterm exam, and the course culminates in the public presentation of a lengthy research project. This course is required for all B.A. and B.S.E. majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and 75 earned credits.

 


Other English Major Courses

 

ENG 2225-01 English Grammar

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 12:30-1:20

As speakers of English, we all have a complete knowledge of the grammar of English, yet that grammar remains a mystery. Why? This course will explore the different systems that make up the complex grammatical structure of our language. We will look at how English structure functions to create meaning, from the word, through the sentence, and on up to entire texts. The course will focus on English in natural contexts from the perspectives of both traditional and functional theory. You will explore the language of your everyday life through the lens of its structure. The goal is to come to an understanding of how our language functions, to become comfortable with the terms and principles of English grammar, and to gain competence in consciously applying the tools of grammar for your own communicative purposes. By utilizing insights gained throughout the course, you should be able to construct your own writing more carefully and maximize its desired impact. This course counts as an elective in the English B.A., the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track, and the new Professional Writing track.

 

ENG 2254-01(W) Introduction to Fiction Writing

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

The success of a piece of writing rests on its truth and on its voice. By voice, I mean the tone in which it is told and the language used to tell it. By truth, I mean its honesty and its passion. The point of this 3-credit class is for you to find your true voice and true concerns as a writer, while mastering the essentials of fiction writing -- character, setting, dialogue, style, voice, etc. In this class, we will work on our writing -- first with exercises and then with complete works -- but we will also work on becoming better readers, both of each other’s work and of the stories in the anthology. Class time will be spent writing, discussing the assigned readings, and workshopping each other’s writing. This course can be used by English B.A. students as an English Elective and can serve as a Language and Literature course in the old General Education program and as Arts and the Human Experiences course in the new. It is also a part of the Creative Writing Minor.

 

ENG 3252-01(W) Advanced Poetry Writing

Prof. Lilace Guignard

Th 6:15-9:15 p.m.

Students further develop their skills as poets by studying contemporary poetry by a wide diversity of writers, writing their own poems, and learning about select theories of poetics. Emphasis will be on students developing a body of work to be edited into a chapbook. Students will give presentations about a “poet mentor,” learn how to evaluate literary markets and how to submit poetry manuscripts for publication, and give a reading of their poems. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience. It is also part of the Creative Writing Minor. Prerequisite: ENG 2252.

 

ENG 3269-01 Survey of British Literature II

Prof. Andrea Harris

M W F 1:30-2:20

Survey of British Literature II covers major British literature from the Romantics through the present. This course fits the British Survey requirement for English BA majors and the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track. This course can be used in the Language and Literature category in the old General Education program, and in the Approaches to Knowledge: Humanities category in the new General Education Program. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3280-01 Survey of American Literature II

Prof. David Stinebeck

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

This course is a survey of American writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. In addition to spanning literary genres, the course provides an overview of the diverse voices producing literature during this period, with special attention given to the historical, social, and literary contexts of the selections. This course fits the American Survey requirement for the English B.A. and the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language, and Literature. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3376-01 Major Genre: Introduction to Film

Prof Brad Lint

M W F 11:30-12:20

This course is an introduction to the art of the cinema. Instead of passively consuming film as mass entertainment, we will analyze how film communicates through its narrative system (plot, events, characters, and setting) and stylistic elements (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound). You will learn the basic vocabulary of film, such as “shot/reverse shot” and “discontinuity editing.” We will also examine how content and form together shape the audience’s experience and how class, gender, race, and sexuality operate to undermine or reinforce ideological positions. We will view and study films from China, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the United States. Assessments include exams, a group presentation, and a formal analysis of a film of students’ choosing. No background or knowledge of film is required; you only need a love of movies and a willingness to see them in a whole new light. This course satisfies the Approaches to Knowledge: Humanities requirement as well as the Major Genre/Major Author/Contemporary Theory requirement for the English B.A. and the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3389-01 Graphic Novel

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 1:00-2:15

This course is a hands-on engagement with graphic literature, exploring the integration of graphics and the written word to produce visual forms of literature. We will read graphic literature (also referred to as “comics”). We will also read about comics, write about comics, talk about comics, and take a stab at creating our own, developing characters and situations, and practicing storyboarding, panel composition, and layout. This will be a class like no other, one that stakes out new territory in word/image studies. We will read some of the best graphic novels, as well as some of the most groundbreaking graphic memoirs, by such authors and artists as Marjane Satrapi and Alison Bechdel. We will explore definitions of “literature,” how these definitions apply to graphic novels, and the tensions that arise from such applications. The class will culminate with a creative project, in which you will write and draw your own graphic novel or memoir, working individually or as part of a small group. Note that artistic ability is not a requirement of this class - your process and your ability to apply what you have learned is of primary importance. Note: Don’t assume this will be easy, just because we’re reading comics. We will be doing a lot of reading, as well as a great deal of analysis, discussion, and hands-on application. This course counts as an elective in the Creative Writing Minor. This course can be used by English B.A. students and the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track as an English Elective and can serve as a Language and Literature course in the old General Education program and as Arts and the Human Experiences course in the new.

 

ENG 3400-01 The Editorial Process

Prof. Dan Mason

M W F 12:30-1:20

This course focuses on copyediting skills and application of editorial style in a variety of contexts, including print and electronic media. It is a core requirement in the new Professional Writing track, and counts as an elective in the new Literary and Cultural Analysis track. Prerequisite: ENG 1112


ENG 4455-01(W) Advanced Novel Writing

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

Students who have completed at least three chapters of a novel will continue to write and revise 3-5 additional chapters, critiquing and discussing one another's work in a constructive workshop atmosphere. An additional component of the course will be the opportunity to demonstrate and facilitate workshops for the introductory fiction writing students. This is course is dual-enrolled with ENG 2254. Prerequisite: ENG 4416.


JN 1100-01 Introduction to Journalism

Prof. Dan Mason

Tu Th 10-11:15

This course introduces the nature and practice of newsgathering, reporting, writing, editing, and professionalism. Students acquire basic skills by covering textbook examples and off-campus breaking stories. This course counts as an elective in the new Professional Writing track.

 


Language Courses

These fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the newly proposed World Language and Cultures major

 

FORL 2255 Intro to Italian II

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 10:30-11:20

Continuation of introduction to Italian I, language and culture. The course is appropriate for those who have completed Intro to Italian I or the equivalent, or 1-2 years of high school Italian courses. Students will consolidate and expand their knowledge of basic structures and vocabulary of Italian as they become more familiar with the geographical, social, and cultural diversity of modern Italy. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. You should be ready to deal with basic language needs in various situations and appreciate the culture you are experiencing on your trip to Italy! 3 cr. Counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters.)

 

FR 1102-01 Intro to French II

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 10:30-11:20

For continuing beginning students and those with two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will continue to bring you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

 

FR 2202-01 Intermediate French II

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 12:30-1:20

French 2202 is a continuation of FR 2201, and it is the best placement for you if you have had four years of high school French. This is a better course for you than FR 1102 because we constantly review and reuse vocabulary and grammar studied in previous semesters, so you will not be wasting your time, and you’ll reach a better level. If you find yourself over your head, we can move you back to the first year (it’s very difficult to more from the first year to this one). Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. In addition to real-life language use, this course stresses reading and writing longer and more challenging texts, offers grammar review, and encourages further practice in aural comprehension and speaking. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: Four years of high school French or FR 2201 or instructor’s approval.

 

GER 1102-01 Introduction to German II

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 9:30-10:20

This course continues where Introduction to German I left off and assumes a background of GER 1101 or 1-2 years of high school German. You will recycle and master older material as you acquire new vocabulary and deepen your understanding of structures. Great emphasis is placed on intercultural knowledge development right alongside development of German language skills. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and be understood in a variety of basic situations; you will have exposure to various regional accents; you will know how to ask questions to get information or clarify things; and you will continue to discover the many cultural differences between your own country and the German-speaking countries. You will be ready to survive in a German setting – and better appreciate your own trip to a German-speaking country! 3 cr. Counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters.)

 

SPA 1101  Intro to Spanish I

Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

 

There are three sections of SPA 1101 available for spring 2016:

 

            SPA 1101-01 Intro to Spanish I

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

            MWF 12:30-1:20

 

            SPA 1101-02 Intro to Spanish I

            Prof. William Keeth

            MWF 9:30-10:20

 

            SPA 1101-03 Intro to Spanish I

            Prof. William Keeth

            MWF 10:30-11:20

 

SPA 1102-01 Intro to Spanish II

This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101. As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

 

            There are two sections of SPA 1102 offered spring 2016

 

            SPA 1102-01 Intro to Spanish II

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

            MWF 1:30-2:20

 

            SPA 1102-02 Intro to Spanish II

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

            MWF   10:30-11:20

 


World Language and Culture Courses

 

WLC 3320-01 France Through Film

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 2:30-3:45

Watching current French-language films (with English subtitles) is one of the best ways to learn how the French live and work. People in France are as diverse as people in America, but in a distinct way, so life in France today is much the same as but also very much different from life in the United States. The French film industry makes films that are not like those made in Hollywood. They maintain a European and French flavor. The ones chosen for the course illustrate key periods of modern French society from the pre-Revolutionary period to the 21st century. We will reflect on the interaction of social systems in France and other French-speaking places. We will work on analytical skills and learn how to better understand a film’s various meanings. We’ll read some literature and essays and relate them to a complex background of historical, social, and cultural events. This course is taught in English and does not require any knowledge of French.

 

WLC 3336-01 Germany Virtual Tour

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 1:30-2:20

By means of an imaginary trip through the states of contemporary Germany, this course offers a detailed overview of the country’s geography, major cities and towns, regional identities, and tourist destinations and curiosities within each region. Along the way, pertinent information about economy, customs, cultural idiosyncrasies, architecture, history, technological developments, and many other aspects is discussed. Students gain insight into their own way of life and culture through frequent comparison with German culture throughout the course “trip.” Extensive use is made of Internet resources, along with other print and audiovisual materials, supported and evaluated by class discussions, brief presentations, quizzes and tests, and a final project. Counts for Gen Ed upper level, Global Perspectives Pt. 2.