Spring 2017 Courses




General Education Courses

(Top)


ENG 1115 - Introduction to Literature

This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course. It does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree.There are three sections of Introduction to Literature offered in Spring 2017:

 

ENG 1115-01 - Introduction to Literature

Prof. Teri Doerksen

MWF 1:30-2:20

 

ENG 1115-02 - Introduction to Literature

Prof. Abby Werlock

MWF 12:30-1:20

 

ENG 1115-03 - Introduction to Literature

Prof. David Stinebeck

Tu Th 8:30-9:45


English Major Core Courses

(Top)


ENG 1130-01(W) - Introduction to Literary Studies

Prof. Lynn Pifer

MWF 9:30-10:20

Introduction to Literary Studies is an intensive introduction to the discipline of literary studies for English majors and minors. Students will become acquainted with literary genres and terms, learn strategies for reading and understanding literature, and develop critical skills for discussing and analyzing literary texts. We will discuss a variety of literarytexts from The Bible to Milton's Paradise Lost, and from Homer's Odyssey to Margaret Atwood's Penelopiade. Where else can you read The Epic of Gilgamesh and pair it up with a Quentin Tarantino film? Students should expect lots of reading and both informal and formal writing assignments, including a research essay using MLA documentation. This course is required for all English majors. It is not a General Education course.

 

ENG 4401-01 (W) - Seminar in Literary Studies

Prof. Teri Doerksen

MWF 12:30-1:20

The senior seminar is a sustained, in-depth study of literature which draws on the expertise developed in previous English courses. This semester we will be exploring the works of Jane Austen. We will be reading her six major novels, and looking at materials to put her work in historical and critical context. The course will begin with Northanger Abbey, then continue with Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. We will read a selection of criticism about each novel, and we will look at the society and customs of the Regency period in England to get a sense of the world in which Jane Austen lived and wrote. The course will culminate with a capstone project.This course is required for all B.A. and B.S.E. majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and 75 earned credits.


JN 1100-01 - Introduction to Journalism

Prof. Dan Mason

Tu Th 10-11:15

This course introduces the nature and practice of news gathering, reporting, writing, editing, and professionalism. Students acquire basic skills by covering textbook examples and off-campus breaking stories. This course counts as an elective in the new Professional Writing Concentration and Professional Writing minor.

 

ENG 2225-01 - English Grammar

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 12:30-1:20

As speakers of English, we all have a complete knowledge of the grammar of English, yet that grammar remains a mystery. Why? This course will explore the different systems that make up the complex grammatical structure of our language. We will look at how English structure functions to create meaning, from the word, through the sentence, and on up to entire texts. The course will focus on English in natural contexts from the perspectives of both traditional and functional theory. You will explore the language of your everyday life through the lens of its structure. The goal is to come to an understanding of how our language functions, to become comfortable with the terms and principles of English grammar, and to gain competence in consciously applying the tools of grammar for your own communicative purposes. By utilizing insights gained throughout the course, you should be able to construct your own writing more carefully and maximize its desired impact. This course counts as an elective in the English B.A., the new Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration, and the new Professional Writing Concentration.

 

ENG 2252-01(W) - Introduction to Poetry Writing

Prof. Lilace Guignard

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

Designed to help students develop their voices and styles as poets and to discover and utilize the various poetic devices and forms through writing exercises, readings and discussing poems, discussing one another’s poems in a supportive atmosphere and through revising poems. This will be accomplished by: immersing ourselves in contemporary adult poetry; experiencing a broad range of styles and poetic devices; trying new things (both as reader and writer); developing a vocabulary for analyzing the choices a writer makes and the effects of those choices; playing with language; flying toward our fears; exploding our senses; and breaking our own hearts. This course fills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes: Arts and the Human Experience. It is also an elective in the English Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration, and part of the Creative Writing Minor.

 

ENG 2254-01(W) - Introduction to Fiction Writing

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 1:00-2:15

The success of a piece of writing rests on its truth and on its voice. By voice, I mean the tone in which it is told and the language used to tell it. By truth, I mean its honesty and its passion. The point of this 3-credit class is for you to find your true voice and true concerns as a writer, while mastering the essentials of fiction writing -- character, setting, dialogue, style, voice, etc. In this class, we will work on our writing -- first with exercises and then with complete works -- but we will also work on becoming better readers, both of each other’s work and of the stories in the anthology. Class time will be spent writing, discussing the assigned readings, and workshopping each other’s writing. This course fills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes: Arts and the Human Experience. It is also an elective in the English Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration and part of the Creative Writing Minor.

 

ENG 3305-01 - Comparative Literature

Prof. Brad Lint

MWF 9:30-10:20

Asia, the world’s largest continent, is home to more than half of the world’s population and is rapidly growing in economic, political, military, and technological power. Many people even refer to the 21st century as the “Asian Century,” especially since China will soon overtake the US as the world’s largest economy, and India will surpass China by mid-century. How is it, then, that we know so little about this vast region of the world? In this course, we will explore the diverse cultures of Asia through literature and film. We will read literary works by authors from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam, while considering the implications of class, gender, race, and sexuality, as well as cultural, postcolonial, religious, psychoanalytic, and poststructuralist approaches in a comparative, global, and historical perspective. We will also explore the very notion of “Asia” through cultural productions ranging from the 2300-year-old Sanskrit epic The Ramayana to the contemporary work of Haruki Murakami and Nobel laureate Mo Yan as well as award-winning examples of Asian cinema. The course includes presentations, exams, and a research paper. This course fills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives – Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option 2). It also fulfills the World / Minority Literature requirement of the English Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3328-01 - Lesbian and Gay Literature

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

In this 3-credit class we will read literature by writers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT), and we will also talk about what it is to be LGBT in our society, bringing in film, music, art, history, television, as well as current news and articles (both online and print). The emphasis of the course will be on active discussion and close introspection into the literature, our society, and ourselves. Students should feel free to bring new books, films, journals, Internet resources, news items, etc., to the attention of the class. Course requirements include active participation, quizzes, online discussion forums, in-class writing and activities, a final memoir project, a midterm and a final exam. This course is an elective in the English Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration and the creative writing minor. ENG 3328 may be used in the Ethics and Civil Responsibilities theme of the Unity and Diversity block of the new General Education model. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3331-01 - Civil Rights Novel

Prof. Lynn Pifer

MWF 10:30-11:20

This course closely examine recent American novels that are based on or show the influence of events that occurred during the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. We will discuss the history behind the novels, literary techniques the authors employ, how the authors choose to portray the events and the people involved, and what we can learn from reading such works today. Students will develop critical reading skills and a greater knowledge of a significant era of recent American history as they read, discuss, and write about a selection of Civil Rights novels. This course is an elective for the English Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration, the African-American Studies minor and the Women's Studies minor. It is also a general education course in Humanities. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3332-01(W) - Nature Writing

Prof. Jimmy Guignard

Tu Th 2:30-3:45

Based on reading, observation, and experience, students will write creative non-fiction prose about nature and discuss each other's work. The course will deal with such issues as the importance of place, the role of science in personal responses to nature, the nature of Nature, and the meaning of "nonfiction" in nature writing. This course counts as an English elective for English majors, as an elective for the creative writing minor, and as an elective course in the new Professional Writing Track for the ENG BA degree. This course can also be used in the Language and Literature category in the old General Education program, and in the Unity and Diversity of Humanity: Sustainability category in the new General Education Program. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3360-01 - British Literature Since 1900

Prof. Andrea Harris

MWF 1:30-2:20

The literature of the last century is typified by radical experimentation, partly in response to the violent political and cultural upheavals of the period. We’ll read the modernists who sought to “make it new” by reacting against the Victorians, as well as the postmodernists who rebelled in turn against their predecessors.  We will study the rework_ing of genres and forms; the emphasis on language and textual play; the shifting relations between sexes, classes, and races; and the impact of cultural changes on literary works. Authors include Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Rhys, and Winterson. This course fills the British period requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 3362-01 - American Romanticism and Transcendentalism

Prof. David Stinebeck

Tu Th 10:00-11:15

A study of American Romanticism and Transcendentalism, focusing on the work of such writers as Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Whitman, Melville, Hawthorne, and Poe. This course fills the American period requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

 

ENG 4416-01 - Novel Writing

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

Tu Th 1:00-2:15

The class will be conducted in a workshop format. This course is heavily writing and workshop-intensive and is recommended only for serious writers who are either working on a novel or interested in starting one. Although you may be continuing novels you began in earlier classes, all work submitted in this class for workshop or for a grade must be new work. This course is an elective in the creative writing minor. Prerequisites: ENG 3254 or permission of instructor. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ENG 2254.


Language Courses

These courses fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the new World Language and Cultures major

(Top)

 

ITA 1102-01 - Introduction to Italian II

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 10:30-11:20

Continuation of introduction to Italian I, language and culture. The course is appropriate for those who have completed Intro to Italian I or the equivalent, or 1-2 years of high school Italian courses. Students will consolidate and expand their knowledge of basic structures and vocabulary of Italian as they become more familiar with the geographical, social, and cultural diversity of modern Italy. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. You should be ready to deal with basic language needs in various situations and appreciate the culture you are experiencing on your trip to Italy! 3 cr. counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters).

 

FR 1101-01 - Introduction to French I

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 12:30-1:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will introduce you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

FR 1102-01 - Introduction to French II

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 10:30-11:20

For continuing beginning students and those with two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will continue to bring you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

GER 1102-01 - Introduction to German II

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 9:30-10:20

This course continues where Introduction to German I left off and assumes a background of GER 1101 or 1-2 years of high school German. You will recycle and master older material as you acquire new vocabulary and deepen your understanding of structures. Great emphasis is placed on intercultural knowledge development right alongside development of German language skills. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and be understood in a variety of basic situations; you will have exposure to various regional accents; you will know how to ask questions to get information or clarify things; and you will continue to discover the many cultural differences between your own country and the German-speaking countries. You will be ready to survive in a German setting – and better appreciate your own trip to a German-speaking country! 3 cr. Counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters).

 

SPA 1101  Introduction to Spanish I

Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

There are three sections of SPA 1101 available for spring 2017:

 

            SPA 1101-01 - Introduction to Spanish I

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

            MWF 9:30-10:20

 

            SPA 1101-02 - Introduction to Spanish I

            Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

            MWF 10:30-11:20

 

            SPA 1101-03 - Introduction to Spanish I

            Prof. William Keeth

            MWF 9:30-10:20

 

SPA 1102-01 - Introduction to Spanish II

Prof. William Keeth

MWF 10:30-11:20

This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101. As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work.General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

 

SPA 2202-01 - Intermediate Spanish II

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

MWF 12:30-1:20

This second segment of the intermediate level Spanish language courses continues to develop the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will increase their understanding and appreciation of the Spanish and Latin American cultures through culturally grounded communicative exercises. Emphasis will be placed on oral and written communication. Prerequisite: SPA 2201 or equivalent.


World Language and Culture Courses

(Top)


WLC 2520-01 Introduction to Latin American Cultures

Prof. William Keeth

M W F 12:30-1:20

This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora. This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2).

 

WLC 3310-01 - Literature in Translation

Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

M W F 1:30-2:20

In this course, students will explore the cultures of the French, German, and Spanish speaking worlds by reading a representative selection of literary works in translation. Students can expect to read, study, and discuss a representative sample of translated texts in all of these languages and in all of the major literary genres. A variety of themes will be covered in this course, some of which include: gender, mythology, sports, voices of resistance, stereotyping, modernity, family, immigration, diaspora, civil rights, etc. Throughout the course, students will reflect on cultural differences in thought, aesthetic style, and thematic emphasis. Prerequisite: ENG 1112.

 

WLC 3340-01 - French Graphic Literature

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 2:30-3:45

French Graphic Literature explores major directions of French graphic literature since the early 20th century. Reading French-language “bandes dessinees” (comic strips, or graphic novels) in English translations helps us discover aspects of French and French-speaking culture. Representative texts include “comic” (funny) strips playing with stereotypical representations of cultures in history or science-fiction, short stories representing current events and social situations in France, “serious” graphic literature interpreting major social or historical events, and/or literary works in the French language. Students reflect on intercultural representations in France and other French-speaking places while analyzing comics within their complex background of social, cultural, historical events. Upper level Gen Ed course, Global Perspectives Option 2 Prerequisites: ENG 1112 or 30 earned credits.

 

WLC 3336-01 - Germany Virtual Tour

Prof. Brad Holtman

MWF 1:30-2:20

By means of an imaginary trip through the states of contemporary Germany, this course offers a detailed overview of the country’s geography, major cities and towns, regional identities, and tourist destinations and curiosities within each region. Along the way, pertinent information about economy, customs, cultural idiosyncrasies, architecture, history, technological developments, and many other aspects is discussed. Students gain insight into their own way of life and culture through frequent comparison with German culture throughout the course “trip.” Extensive use is made of Internet resources, along with other print and audiovisual materials, supported and evaluated by class discussions, brief presentations, quizzes and tests, and a final project. Counts for Gen Ed upper level, Global Perspectives Pt. 2. Prerequisites: 30 earned credits.