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Mansfield University... Developing Tomorrow's Leaders English


Fall 2015 Courses


General Education

AAS 1100-190

Introduction to African American Studies through Literature

Online

Prof. Edward Washington

This introductory course provides a broad-based overview of African American life and culture through a variety of cross-disciplinary perspectives, including history, literature, philosophy, politics, socio-economics, and the arts, students gain insights into the black experience as it relates to their individual lives, the country, and the larger world. This course counts towards the African American Studies minor; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Ethics and Civic Responsibility.

 

ENG 1115 Introduction to Literature

This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course.It does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree.There are three sections of Intro. to Lit. offered Fall 2015:

 

ENG 1115-01

Introduction to Literature

MWF 1:30-2:20

Staff

 

ENG 1115-190

Introduction to Literature

Online

Staff

 

ENG 1115-03

Introduction to Literature

MWF 9:30-10:20

Prof. David Stinebeck

 


English

ENG 1130-01(W)

Introduction to Literary Studies

MWF 9:30-1:20

Prof. Lynn Pifer

Introduction to Literary Studies is an intensive introduction to the discipline of literary studies for English majors and minors. Students will become acquainted with literary genres and terms, learn strategies for reading and understanding literature, and develop critical skills for discussing and analyzing a variety of literary texts from Gilgamesh and The Odyssey, to Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets, to a Quentin Tarantino film. Students should expect lots of reading and both informal and formal writing assignments, including a research essay using MLA documentation. This course is required for all English majors. It is not a General Education course.

 

ENG 2252-01(W)

Intro to Poetry Writing

Prof. Mitch Goldwater

TTH 1:00-2:15

In one sense, Poetry is a thing you can hear and read and study. You can pick up a book of it at the library or listen to a reading. But Poetry is also a way of being in the world: its about heightened perceptions, about noticing small things as significant, about making interesting connections and feeling them right there in the gut. It’s about seeing things newly, differently. “Poetry” in this other sense has us cultivating a sensitivity toward the world and its happenings as well as to words and their implications. This class aims for both kinds of poetry. We’ll read a lot of poems by others and see what works for each of us; we’ll scavenge what we can from what we read. We’ll break poems down for how they work, and for what work they ask the reader to do. We’ll imitate. We’ll generate new material from experience. We’ll look closely at poems through elements of craft—sound, line and line ending, form, image, etc.—and we’ll use these elements to give our work power and also to generate fresh associations and perceptions. There’ll be free verse, form, meter, There will be a variety of rhymes. We’ll get some familiarity with the process of composing and revising our drafts. And we’ll try, every once in a while, to order up some magic, like a pizza we can all share, delivered by a muse to our classroom door. This course is required in the newly revised Creative Writing minor and may be used as an elective course in the English BA major; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience.

 

ENG 2254-01(W)

Intro to Fiction Writing

TTH 2:30-3:45

Prof. Sullivan-Blum

The success of a piece of writing rests on its truth and on its voice. By voice, I mean the tone in which it is told and the language used to tell it. By truth, I mean its honesty and its passion. The point of this 3-credit class is for you to find your true voice and true concerns as a writer, while mastering the essentials of fiction writing -- character, setting, dialogue, style, voice, etc. In this class, we will work on our writing -- first with exercises and then with complete works -- but we will also work on becoming better readers, both of each others'  work and of the stories in the anthology. Class time will be spent writing, discussing the assigned readings, and workshopping each others' writing. This course is a prerequisite for ENG 3254 - Advanced Fiction Writing. This course is required in the newly revised Creative Writing minor and may be used as an elective course in the English BA major; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience.

 

ENG 3268-190

Survey of British Literature I

Online

Prof. Edward Washington

This on-line course covers a thousand years of British literature from its earliest folk beginnings through the first glimmers of the novel in the mid-1700s.We will begin with the monsters in Beowulf and cover Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain, the best of the morality dramas, a bit of Shakespeare, Donne’s Holy Sonnets, metaphysical poetry, New World fantasy, Paradise Lost, Swift, Pope, and Robinson Crusoe.This online course will require substantive participation in 3-4 day discussion board activities; there will also be two 3.5-5 page papers and 2 exams. Prerequisite:ENG 1112.This course fulfills the British Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness.

ENG 3278-01

Survey of American Literature I

Tu Th 2:30-3:45

Prof. David Stinebeck

A survey of 17th, 18th, and early 19th century American writers.  Prerequisite:ENG 1112.This course fulfills the American Survey requirement for English majors; it also fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature.

 

ENG 3316-01(W)

Creative Nonfiction Writing

MW 2:30-3:45

Prof. Lilace Guignard

Students will read and analyze published nonfiction, including essays, magazines articles, and electronic media, and experiment with form and subject matter. Genres explored will include memoir, literary journalism, and socio-political commentary. Small group workshops will help students revise and edit their own and each other’s writing while learning a variety of editing skills. The emphasis of the class is on in-depth discussion of student work, the assigned readings, and the process of writing. Prerequisite: ENG 1112. This course is an elective for the New English Professional Writing Track and the Creative Writing minor. It also fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience Language and Literature

 

ENG 3326-01/WS4410-01

Women’s Literature/WS Capstone

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. Andrea Harris

Our focus in this class will be a selection of fascinating literary texts by twentieth-century American women writers. The enormous changes in women’s lives during the last century will determine the wide range of subjects that we will examine: women’s entrance into the public sphere; coming of age; gender, race, sexuality, and ethnicity; and madness. Authors include Chopin, Gilman, Hurston, Plath, Allison, and Lahiri. Assignments will include response papers, formal papers, a midterm, and a final exam. This course fulfills the World/Minority Literature requirement for the English major; it counts towards the Women’s Studies minor; it fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness; and it is cross-listed with WS 4410 Seminar in Women’s Studies, a Women's Studies minor requirement. 

 

ENG 3360-01

British Literature Since 1900

MWF 9:30-10:20 a.m.     

Prof. Andrea Harris

The literature of the last century is typified by radical experimentation, partly in response to the violent political and cultural upheavals of the period. We’ll read the modernists who sought to “make it new” by reacting against the Victorians, as well as the postmodernists who rebelled in turn against their predecessors. We will study the rework­ing of genres and forms; the emphasis on language and textual play; the shifting relations between sexes, classes, and races; and the impact of cultural changes on literary works. Authors include Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Rhys, and Winterson.Prerequisite:ENG 1112.This course fills the British period requirement for English majors.General Education Requirement: Global Awareness.

 

ENG 3404-01

Writing for the Web

MWF 1:30-2:20 p.m.

Prof. Brad Lint

This course is about writing, not technology: tools come and go, but principles of rhetoric, writing, and design generally do not. Although this course will involve some coding and scripting, it primarily extends skills learned in Composition I to the creation of sophisticated Web texts. You will author content while learning to develop content strategies, write for SEO (search engine optimization), create personas and scenarios, write key messages and layer information, build organic style guides, and divide content. You will also be asked to reimagine content as part of a larger conversation with site visitors. Similar to what is known as “reader-based prose,” this course is predicated on UX (user-experience design). You will learn to craft messages that account for user diversity, goals, needs, environments, and behaviors; mobility; and universal usability. The bridge between content and audience, of course, is rhetoric; as you develop a variety of Web texts, you will critically analyze the rhetorical situation of many kinds of Web writing. This course may at first seem to be a radical departure from what most people think of as “composition”; you will quickly find, however, that much of what we do involves adaptation of time-honored principles of clarity and concision to new media. This course is taught in a computer lab and involves a great deal of hands-on practice in weekly workshops. No previous Web design experience is required, but it would be helpful for students to have experience navigating Web sites and be familiar with a variety of online content. Projects include Web site critiques and construction, document redesign, collaborative Web development using Google Drive, and student presentations.This course is a core course for the new English B.A. Professional Writing Track. It is not a general education course.

 

ENG 4416

Novel Writing

TTH 1:00-2:15 p.m.

Prof. Louise Sullivan-Blum

This course builds on the work done in ENG 2254 Introduction to Fiction Writing and/or ENG 3254 Advanced Fiction Writing. In this class, we will read several published novels and work on writing our own. The class will be conducted in a seminar/workshop format, discussing and analyzing both the required texts and each other’s work in a workshop environment. This course is heavily writing and workshop-intensive and is recommended only for serious writers who are either working on a novel or interested in starting one.  Although you may be continuing a novel you began in a previous class, all work submitted in this class for workshop or for a grade must be new work (i.e. work we haven't seen yet). Final portfolio requirements include the first 3 chapters and a synopsis of a novel. If you have not taken the prerequisite, please contact Prof. Sullivan-Blum ASAP to be considered for admission. Prerequisite: ENG 2254 or permission of instructor. This course counts towards the Creative Writing minor.

 


Languages

These courses fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the newly proposed World Language and Cultures major

 

FR 1101-01 Intro to French I

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 10:30-11:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will introduce you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write—in French—simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

 

FR 2201-01 (W) Intermediate French I

Prof. Monique Oyallon

MWF 10:30-11:20

French 2201 is a continuation of FR 1102, and it is the best placement for you if you have had three or more years of high school French. Even if you feel insecure, this is a better place for you than in FR 1101 because we start with a review of the first year, so you will not be wasting a year, and you’ll reach a better level. If you find yourself over your head, we can move you back to the first year (it’s very difficult to more from the first year to this one). Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. In addition to real-life language use this course stresses reading and writing longer texts, offers grammar review, and encourages further practice in aural comprehension and speaking. Prerequisite: Three years of high school French or FR 1102. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisites: 1102 or equivalent.

GER 1101 Intro to German I

Prof. Bradley Holtman

MWF 9:30-10:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school German who wish to review their knowledge starting from the very beginning. Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are all taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required weekly. This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

FORL 2255 Intro to Italian I

Prof. Bradley Holtman

MWF 10:30-11:20

Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. The course is appropriate for those with no experience or who wish to refresh their previous knowledge of the language. This course meets the following General Education Requirements: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

 

SPA 1101Intro to Spanish I

Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish.This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature

 

There are two sections of SPA 1101 available for fall 2015:

 

      SPA 1101-01 Intro to Spanish I

      Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

      MWF 10:30-11:20

 

      SPA 1101-02 Intro to Spanish I
      Prof. William Keeth

      MWF 1:30-2:20

 

SPA 1102-01 Intro to Spanish II
This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101.As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish.This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

 

There are three sections of SPA 1102 offered fall 2015

      SPA 1102-01 Intro to Spanish II
      Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

      MWF 1:30-2:20

 

      SPA 1102-02 Intro to Spanish II
      Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

      MWF11:30-12:20


      SPA 1102-03 Intro to Spanish II
      Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth

      MWF 10:30-11:20

 


New: World Language and Culture

WLC 2510-01

Introduction to German Film

MWF 1:30-2:20

Prof. Brad Holtman

This course is taught in English and introduces students to film as a mirror of German culture, offering a cross-section of typical sociopolitical and cultural themes. Topics might include Expressionist films and their relation to art and literature, films from divided Germany with perspectives from West and East, films about coming to grips with the Nazi German past, and trends in German cinema since the reunification in 1990. Students will become acquainted with some of the important figures in German films and will examine contemporary issues in society via the film medium. Evaluations include class discussion, reaction papers, quizzes, exams, and projects. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2)

 

WLC 2520-01

Introduction to Latin American Cultures

MWF 12:30-1:20

Prof. William Keeth

This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2)

 


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