Spring 2018 Courses


Spring 2018 Courses


English Courses    

ENG 1115 - Introduction to Literature
This general education course provides an introduction to reading poetry, fiction, and drama for understanding and enjoyment. This is a General Education Humanities course. It does NOT count towards the ENG B.A. or B.S.E. degree. There are two sections of Introduction to Literature offered in Spring 2018:

ENG 1115-01 - Introduction to Literature
Prof. Andrea Harris
MW 2:30-3:45

ENG 1115-02 - Introduction to Literature
Prof. Teri Doerksen
MWF 9:30-10:20

ENG 2225-01 - English Grammar
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 12:30-1:20

As speakers of English, we all have a complete knowledge of the grammar of English, yet that grammar remains a mystery. Why? This course will explore the different systems that make up the complex grammatical structure of our language. We will look at how English structure functions to create meaning, from the word, through the sentence, and on up to entire texts. The course will focus on English in natural contexts from the perspectives of both traditional and functional theory. You will explore the language of your everyday life through the lens of its structure. The goal is to come to an understanding of how our language functions, to become comfortable with the terms and principles of English grammar, and to gain competence in consciously applying the tools of grammar for your own communicative purposes. By utilizing insights gained throughout the course, you should be able to construct your own writing more carefully and maximize its desired impact.
This course is required for the B.S.Ed. English Concentration, and counts as an elective in the English B.A., both Literary and Cultural Analysis and Professional Writing Concentrations.

ENG 2252-01(W) - Introduction to Poetry Writing
Prof. Lilace Guignard
Tu Th 10:00-11:15

Designed to help students develop their voices and styles as poets and to discover and utilize the various poetic devices and forms through writing exercises, readings and discussing poems, discussing one another's poems in a supportive atmosphere and through revising poems. This will be accomplished by: immersing ourselves in contemporary adult poetry; experiencing a broad range of styles and poetic devices; trying new things (both as reader and writer); developing a vocabulary for analyzing the choices a writer makes and the effects of those choices; playing with language; flying toward our fears; exploding our senses; and breaking our own hearts.
This course fills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Themes: Arts and the Human Experience. It is also an elective for the English B.A., both Literary and Cultural Analysis and Professional Writing Concentrations., and is part of the Creative Writing Minor.

ENG 3316-01(W) - Creative Nonfiction Writing
Prof. Lilace Guignard
Tu Th 8:30-9:45

Students will read and write in a number of creative nonfiction prose genres, such as the personal memoir, the segmented essay, nature writing, and social and political commentary, learning to use a number of writing techniques through exercises designed to stir creativity and stimulate ideas. Students will discuss one another’s writing in a supportive, rigorous atmosphere. You will take risks—creatively, intellectually, and emotionally. You will find and use your passions and obsessions. You will pour yourself into your writing, yet separate yourself from it when it comes time for feedback. You will embrace revision because it is the long-term deep love, not that love-at-first-draft-sight. You will give time and energy to reading your peers’ work and providing constructive feedback. You will train your self-editor. You will learn to read as a writer (and to read a lot). You will fail in small ways so you can succeed in big ways.
This course fills the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Themes: Arts and the Human Experience. It is also an elective for the English B.A., both Literary and Cultural Analysis and Professional Writing Concentrations., and is part of the Creative Writing Minor.

ENG 3326-01 - Women's Literature
Prof. Andrea Harris
Tu Th 2:30-3:45

Our focus in this class will be a selection of fascinating literary texts by twentieth-century American women writers. The enormous changes in women's lives during the last century will determine the wide range of subjects that we will examine: women's entrance into the public sphere; coming of age; gender, race, sexuality, and ethnicity; and madness. Authors include Chopin, Gilman, Hurston, Plath, Allison, and Lahiri. Assignments will include response papers, formal papers, a midterm, and a final exam.
Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112. This course fulfills the World/Minority Literature requirement for the English major; it counts towards the Women's Studies minor; it fulfills the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge -- Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness; and it is cross-listed with WS 4410 Seminar in Women's Studies, a Women's Studies minor requirement.

ENG 3359-01 - 19th Century British Literature
Prof. Teri Doerksen
MWF 10:30-11:20

The college catalog describes this course as a study of major literary figures of the Restoration and eighteenth century. This is a period that is often referred to as "the rise of the novel," and we'll be reading a selection of some the of early experiments in novel writing, before anyone was really sure what the novel was going to look like in the long term. We'll also look at some plays from an era when playwriting was a lot better respected than novel writing, and some poetry from a time when poetry was the most respected literary form. We'll talk about culture and history, what was considered shocking, what was considered commonplace, how people acted in polite society, and the roles of men and women in public and in private. You will be reading novels, plays, and poetry by authors whose names you may recognize: Behn, Defoe, Centlivre, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Burney. You will also be engaged in a study of genre, and of the sensibilities that define genre. What makes a piece of writing a "novel" or a "poem" during this period? What makes it a "good novel" or a "good poem"? How do novels and plays construct character? In what ways do they engage in social instruction, and to what ends? How did they interact with the world in which they created, and which they in turn helped to create?
Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112. This course fits the following General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge -- Humanities, Language & Literature, Global Awareness, and the British period requirement for English majors.

ENG 3371-01 - Professional Writing
Prof. Jimmy Guignard
Tu Th 1-2:15

This course teaches students to write for various purposes in professional contexts. Particular attention will be paid to issues of audience awareness and style. Students will write texts for various contexts, including, but not limited to, letters, resumes, memos, press releases, reports, analyses, and grants.
This course is required for ENG B.A. majors. It is not a general education course. Prerequisite: ENG 1112W or ESL 1112.

ENG 3400-01 - Editorial Process
Prof. Lynn Pifer
MWF 1:30-2:20

This is a copy editing course. It focuses on copyediting skills and application of editorial style in a variety of contexts, including print and electronic media.The bulk of the course will focus on use of professional editorial style related to punctuation, spelling and hyphenation, capitalization, numbers and numerals, quotations, abbreviations and references, and copyeditors' marks; attention will also be given to language editing, grammar and style. Students will engage in hands-on editing workshops, and will have ample opportunity to individually practice proofreading and copyediting, and to compare their work.
It is a core requirement in the English B.A. Professional Writing concentration, and counts as an elective in the Literary and Cultural Analysis concentration. Prerequisite: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

ENG 4401-01 (Senior Seminar) - Narratives and Metanarratives: Haruki Murakami
Prof. Brad Lint
MWF 9:30-10:20

Haruki Murakami is a towering figure in postmodernism. The author of fourteen novels, four short story collections, and even a memoir about running, Murakami has turned Japanese literature on its head with his surreal, Kafkaesque style. He has been translated into fifty languages, and he regularly translates American literature (including the work of Truman Capote, Raymond Carver, F Scott Fitzgerald, John Irving, JD Salinger, and Paul Theroux) into Japanese. His themes of love, loss, and collective trauma are interwoven with dreamlike, fantastic, and magical elements, yet still reveal a cultural and historical connectedness. This semester, we will read several of Murakami’s novels; explore criticism of Murakami; apply critical theory, especially postmodern approaches of Baudrillard, Debord, Lyotard, and others; examine Murakami's Japanese and Western context; and reflect on the current epistemic crisis in the West regarding what is "real" and "fake." You will write weekly response papers and take a midterm exam, and the course culminates in the public presentation of a lengthy research project. This course is required for all B.A. and B.S.E. majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1112 and 75 earned credits.

JN 1100 - Journalism
Prof. Dan Mason
Tu Th 10:00-11:15

This course introduces the nature and practice of newsgathering, reporting, writing, editing, and professionalism. Students acquire basic skills by covering textbook examples, as well as campus and off-campus breaking stories. This course counts as an elective in the B.A. English - Professional Writing concentration.

Language Courses

These courses fulfill the language requirement for the English major and the World Language and Cultures major.

FR 1101-01 - Introduction to French I
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MWF 12:30-1:20

For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will introduce you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write--in French--simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture.
General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

FR 1102-01 -- Introduction to French II
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MWF 10:30-11:20

For continuing beginning students and those with two years of high school French. Emphasis is on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with online practice on a language lab. The course will continue to bring you to real-life language use, letting you gossip in French about family, friends, and others, to discuss student life and food, to write--in French--simple messages current in everyday life. By stressing the integration of language and culture, it gives you an opportunity to discover how French/French-speaking people speak and interact, and to learn a few things about French culture.
General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature.

GER 1102-01 - Introduction to German II
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 9:30-10:20

This course continues where Introduction to German I left off and assumes a background of GER 1101 or 1-2 years of high school German. You will recycle and master older material as you acquire new vocabulary and deepen your understanding of structures. Great emphasis is placed on intercultural knowledge development right alongside development of German language skills. By the end of the semester, you should be able to understand and be understood in a variety of basic situations; you will have exposure to various regional accents; you will know how to ask questions to get information or clarify things; and you will continue to discover the many cultural differences between your own country and the German-speaking countries. You will be ready to survive in a German setting -- and better appreciate your own trip to a German-speaking country!
3 cr. Counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters).

ITA 1102-01 - Introduction to Italian II
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 10:30-11:20

Continuation of introduction to Italian I, language and culture. The course is appropriate for those who have completed Intro to Italian I or the equivalent, or 1-2 years of high school Italian courses. Students will consolidate and expand their knowledge of basic structures and vocabulary of Italian as they become more familiar with the geographical, social, and cultural diversity of modern Italy. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. You should be ready to deal with basic language needs in various situations and appreciate the culture you are experiencing on your trip to Italy!
3 cr. Counts for Gen Ed Global 1 (This is the second of two required semesters).

SPA 1101 - Introduction to Spanish I
Crafted for students with little experience with languages, this entry level Spanish course helps students develop basic oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work.
General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. There are two sections of SPA 1101 available for spring 2018:

    SPA 1101-01 - Introduction to Spanish I
    Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
    MWF 9:30-10:20

    SPA 1101-02 - Introduction to Spanish I
    Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
    MWF 10:30-11:20

SPA 1102-01 - Introduction to Spanish II
This course is intended for students who have had some prior experience learning Spanish or have taken Spa 1101. As Spa 1101's successor, this course helps students extend their basic-level oral and written communication skills in Spanish. This course is aligned with the General Education Program and requires online lab work.
General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1), Global Awareness, Language and Literature. Prerequisite: SPA 1101 or equivalent. There are two sections of SPA 1102 available for spring 2018:

    SPA 1102-01 - Introduction to Spanish II
    Prof. Fanny Arango-Keeth
    MWF 12:30-1:20

    SPA 1102-02 - Introduction to Spanish II
    Prof. William Keeth
    MWF 10:30-11:20

World Language and Culture Courses

WLC 2500-01 - Introduction to Paris
Prof. Monique Oyallon
MWF 2:30-3:45

This course is an introduction to everyday life in Paris, at once a global modern city and a living museum. Paris is a vibrant culture and commercial hub and the academic place of excellence in France, a city of continuity and change, of love and conflicts - the home of expatriates, artists, romantics, and revolutionaries of every kind. We will study the history and geography of Paris and trace the city's evolution, from its Roman arena to its Eiffel Tower, from the Louvre's medieval foundations to its ultra-modern glass pyramid. We will look at architecture, painting, sculpture, music, literature, film, and popular culture and study how they express ways of life over the centuries.
This course counts for the following General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity -- Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2).

WLC 3336-01 - Germany Virtual Tour
Prof. Brad Holtman
MWF 1:30-2:20

By means of an imaginary trip through the states of contemporary Germany, this course offers a detailed overview of the country's geography, major cities and towns, regional identities, and tourist destinations and curiosities within each region. Along the way, pertinent information about economy, customs, cultural idiosyncrasies, architecture, history, technological developments, and many other aspects is discussed. Students gain insight into their own way of life and culture through frequent comparison with German culture throughout the course "trip." Extensive use is made of Internet resources, along with other print and audiovisual materials, supported and evaluated by class discussions, brief presentations, quizzes and tests, and a final project.
Counts for Gen Ed upper level, Global Perspectives Pt. 2. Prerequisites: 30 earned credits.